Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Our little chatterbox

A couple of days ago, I started writing a list of all the words and phrases Eleri uses regularly. She does plenty of repetition of sounds, and sometimes when she and Soren are playing she will spend minutes at a time just repeating the last word of whatever sentence he's just finished. That in itself is pretty cute and funny. But in putting together this list, I restricted my entries to things she seems to (for the most part) actually use correctly and deliberately (i.e. not just mimicking).

Let me back up a second. A few weeks ago, Eleri had her 18 month doctor visit. During the little pre-assessment period (before the doctor got there) the nurse asked, among other things, if Eleri knows "between 5 and 20 words." I laughed and said she knew well more than that. I had never sat down and counted them all, but I knew it was definitely over 20. A few days later, Tom & I were talking about it, and he said he was actually a little concerned about Eleri's verbal development (compared with Soren's at the same age), but that he could come up with about 30 words that he thought she knew. So I started listing some - many MANY of which were met with "oh, I forgot that one" or "ah, wasn't counting that" - and soon we were up to about 80.

Okay, so that was a couple of weeks ago. Fast-forward to Monday of this week, when I started writing them all down. I've come up with (as of this morning)...168 words and 22 phrases. Pretty good! In the interest of preserving the list for my own - and Eleri's - future amusement (and, okay, just a wee bit of maternal crowing), here's the breakdown:

People/Pets/Friends
[A's name]
Daddy
Ellie
Grandma
Grandpa
Jo-Bean (Soren's imaginary friend JoJo Beans)
[Soren's friend L's name]
Leo
Loki
Mommy
Soren

Food-Related
apple
banana
cheese
chicken
cracker
dinner
drink
food
fruit
granola bar
grape
mac cheese
milk
noodle
orange
pizza
spicy snack
yogurt

Body Parts
arm
back
beebo (belly button)
cheek
ear
elbow
eye
face
feet
finger
hair
hand
head
knee
lap
leg
mouth
neck
nipple
nose
shoulder
teeth
thumb
toes
tummy

Clothing
diaper
glasses
hat
'jamas
pants
sandal
shirt
shoe
sock

Animals
cat/kitty
duck
goldfish
monkey
pony
puppy
spider

Places/Prepositions
down
home
off
on
outside
up
work (as in "Daddy's at...")

Verbs
change
clap
draw
dribble
eat
go
have
help
hug
jump
kick
pee
pinch
poke
read
ride
share
sit
slide
swing
tickle
zoom

Adjectives
cold
delicious
happy
hot
mine
stinky
stuck
tasty
yours
yummy

Nouns
baby
backpack
bag
ball
bath
bike
book
bottle
bowl
bucket
bus
camera
CD
chair
claw
cup
door
elevator
fan
flower
garbage
ipod
keys
letter
nap
paper
phone
picture
poop
potty
radio
show
sticker
stroller
timer
train
tree
truck
tv (vee-vee)
vacuum
water

Exclamations/Greetings/Misc.
bonk
bye
can't
careful
gentle
here
hi/hello
hooray
no
okay
oops
ouch
that
whee
wow
yeah/yap
yuck

Phrases
all done
come back
don't want to
for you
go 'way
here/there you go
I/we did it
let go
love you
me too
my turn
no bites
not nice
oh my
pants off
ready, set, go
thank you
the end
uh 'appened
uh oh
whazzat?
whoa, dude

3 comments:

motherissues said...

This is fascinating! It does seem like she has a very big vocabulary. I can't compare Mara's to anyone else's because she was so far behind, but at twice Eleri's age she was much closer to 20 words than 168, though she's now back where she needs to be.

The first time I read this, I was mostly grieving for what Mara didn't have by being unable to express herself for so long. Rereading, though, makes me just happy for Eleri and her family, for you and Tom for being so aware of the similarities and differences between your two little ones.

susan said...

Oh Thorn. I certainly didn't mean to make anyone feel bad - even if just on first pass - by posting this. I forget sometimes that anyone besides my kids' crowing grandparents read here.

motherissues said...

No, no, no, don't feel bad! It's just that words and Mara's lack of them when we first met her have become the one area that makes me really grieve for what she missed out on. It's actually very useful to be able to link her progress to that of another real child, and I'm fascinated by how kid speech works and how parents perceive it.

Her best friend turns three next week and in December, he spoke a little better than she (at 3 & a month) did in certain respects, whereas now he's eating her verbal dust, though they're still great friends.